John Crock
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon

Member
Australian
Society of
Plastic Surgeons

Eyelid Plastic Surgery Melbourne

Eyelid surgery, also known as Blepharoplasty, is an operation designed to treat a number of eyelid conditions, including baggy eyes or droopy eyes.

Plastic surgery is a specialty that has evolved to reconstruct parts of the body that have been injured or damaged by trauma, disease, or time. As tissues age, they lose their elasticity and become loose, wrinkled, and less efficient, as well as more prone to disease. They can be affected by diseases including skin cancers, connective tissue anomalies, or muscle pathologies. In the case of eyelids, this can then affect function as well as form. Patients with tissue laxity and/or excess of their eyelid skin not only look tired, but also experience difficulty reading or seeing in some circumstances.

 

How can eyelid surgery help?

The key with eyelid surgery is to minimise removal of skin or fat, but rather sculpt the tissues and use the healing process to restore form and function. As such, eyelid surgery is a complicated and very finely balanced surgical procedure, and careful planning is essential. It is vital to know if the muscles that lift the eyes are working normally, and then to understand how the skin and fat layers are sliding over each other, and to take into consideration the tear duct drainage of the eye and the functioning of the globe itself.

Whilst it is our objective to improve or restore appearance, our primary focus is always on function. In the case of eyelid surgery this is particularly relevant, and in order to reconstruct eyelids, a precise understanding of the tissue planes, and their interrelations, is essential. Blepharoplasty has been changing somewhat over the years, particularly as the understanding of the anatomy and pathology evolves, and as surgical capabilities improve.

 

Eye lift surgery Melbourne

Eye lift surgery is different from other forms of blepharoplasty, and often this procedure is planned in conjunction with an ophthalmologist, and therefore each case is assessed on its own merits and often a team of clinicians are involved in the planning of surgery.

 

About the blepharoplasty procedure

Eyelid surgery is typically done as a day case in an operating theatre, and local anaesthetic is usually employed so that post operative pain is minimal. Nevertheless, patients are encouraged to rest for several days after this surgery. The use of ice packs or moist compress dressings is also encouraged.

Complications of this surgery are rare, especially as precautions are made to minimise the risk of bleeding, infection, scarring or loss of tissue – but it is always part of the surgical process to anticipate, prevent or mitigate the known risks. This is always discussed as part of your preoperative consultation, and we have videos for educational purposes to help you prepare for your procedure.